What type of sleeping bag for camping

LisaSusan

Posted: Sat, Apr 28, 2012, 9:32

Hi we are doing the GR20 end of August (camping) was wondering whether I need a 2 or 3 season sleeping bag, can anyone give me any advice.
Lisa

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Lisa



Turnertactics
moderator

Posted: Mon, Apr 30, 2012, 13:52

Take a two season down bag. Two season is warm enough. Down is lighter and fairly cheap these days. If you do get chilly at night, which isn't likely in August, just put a T shirt on.

--

Alan



Michele
moderator

Posted: Mon, Apr 30, 2012, 14:00

Lisa,

Recommending the right sleeping bag is very difficult because everyone reacts to the external temperatures in a different way. However, I think a 0° C. comfort sleeping bag should be ok. In case of doubt just choose a warmer one (to stay on the safe side).

--Michele



Liviu

Posted: Tue, May 1, 2012, 9:46

Hello everyone,
If I choose to stay in huts, do I need a sleeping bag or it is enough to carry a thin innerliner usually used to protect sleeping bags against perspiration?
Do they give to the tourist blankets?

Thanks,
Liviu



LisaSusan

Posted: Tue, May 1, 2012, 11:58

Lisa
Hi Livlu
We decided not to stay in the refuges and camp instead because of several reasons one of them being the risk of bedbugs at certain huts. I am aware that over the winter the Park Authorities have fumigated the refuges so the problem may have gone away. However if you need use a sleeping bag in the refuges you may risk getting it infested as bedbugs are a recurring problem. It depends on when you are planning to do the GR20 on what level of sleeping system you need.

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Lisa



Turnertactics
moderator

Posted: Tue, May 1, 2012, 19:33

I guess I was a bit 'extreme' with my weight saving. A three season bag would be the sensible option and, if I'm honest, is what I took to do the northern section. Bed bugs get transferred very easilly from hut to hut and back home again too. I'd go for camping but partly because I like camping. The extra weight is minimal if you eat in the refuges.

--

Alan



Liviu

Posted: Wed, May 2, 2012, 19:34

Thanks a lot guys,
One more question: is it too cold in huts to do not carry sleeping bag?

Liviu



DrGT

Posted: Wed, May 2, 2012, 23:39

In 2006, I completed the Northern section in bad conditions in late September-early October. Since I am a "warm person", I thought that it would be good to save some weight and I brought a Haglöfs Lim 50 sleeping bag with T Comf = +16 C, T Lim = +13 C and T Ext = +1 C - it was a bad choice!! This bag worked fine the nights we stayed in the refuges, but two nights in a tent at sub-zero temperatures at Verghio and Pietra Piana was not fun at all. Despite wearing all my clothes, wool hat and gloves, we were not getting enough sleep.

Last summer (mid to end of June), I completed the whole GR20 starting from Conca and wise from last time at GR20, I knew that after a long day's trek, tired and hungry, my usual "warmth" is gone and the nights high up in the mountains feel cold. Since we were planning to sleep in a tent all nights, I therefore decided to spend some money on a very light, yet warm and comfortable set of sleeping gear. I used the following:

Sleeping bag: Western Mountaineering HighLite (T Comf = +5 C, T Lim = 0 C, T Ext = -15 C), 440 grams in length 167 cm, 460 grams in 183 cm length and 500 grams in 198 cm length. This sleeping bag is narrow in the end so the feet lie rubbing on eachother and the zipper ony goes half way, but I opted for lightness instead of more room in the bag.

Sleeping bag liner in silk (100 grams) to avoid having naked skin against the sleeping bag nylon. It also worked well in the beginning of the evening when it was warmer to open up the bag to to my waist and just have the liner covering the upper body. Then when the temperature fell later in the night, I just zipped up the bag as much as I wanted.

Sleeping mat: Exped Synmat Basic UL 7.5M (183 cm x 50 cm x 7 cm) inflatable mat. Comfy and light at 420 grams. Quite quick to inflate too and thick enough so that I could sleep on my side without having my hip bone touching the ground :)

Sleeping mat protection: very thin foam mat (180 cm x 50 cm x 0.6 cm) to minimise the risk of punctures to the inflatable mat. Only 70 grams.

Sum: slightly above 1 kg for a set including warm bag and comfy mat.

I wished that I had brought something to increase the friction between the sleeping bag and the inflatable mat because the places where you camp along GR20 is not level enough for a low friction coefficient between bag and mat. Some nights I was constantly sliding to the bottom of the tent (when putting it up so we have the head highest). An idea to increase bag-to-mat friction could be to use another thin mat (70 grams extra) or the type of net that you put under a woven carpet to increase the friction between that and a wooden floor. That should not weigh more than 20 grams and it takes up less space. I still need to try out if this net will work in reality.

With my experience above, I second Michele's recommendation to use at least a sleeping bag with T Comf = 0 C.

Good luck!



Michele
moderator

Posted: Thu, May 3, 2012, 11:00

DrGT,

A little offtopic about the non level ground.

I devised a simple but effective way to cope with the sloping terrain. I always pitch my tent in a way so that the body is always sideways to the direction of the slope. Then I prop the mat up from underneath the lower side with whatever I may have (i.e. a fleece jacket). Lately I further perfected this technique by using a couple of inflatable collars (those used during travel to rest the head) conveniently positioned in the right spots. And I must say I'm pretty happy with this solution.

--Michele



hotelmedicis

Posted: Sat, May 19, 2012, 13:27

Take a warm sleeping bag. Deaths on the GR20 are often due to hypothermia. If a storm breaks and you are cut off from the refuges and need to spend the night in the woods you never know if it will be very cold or not.

I did it with the following bag and I was NOT disappointed:

Marmot Helium -9C/+15F 850 Fill-Power Down.

This bag with stuff-sac is just over 1kg.

You could try getting away with the Marmot Atom (good to about +5C/+40F) but I would not risk it for the weight saving of 300 grams.

Remember, you are camping at well over 1000 meters and I don't care if it's July or August, the nights are COLD, partly perhaps due to the very dry air. Bring a WARM sleeping bag.

Hope that helps.



maarinsh

Posted: Mon, Jul 6, 2015, 8:42

Could anyone specify what are average day and night temperatures for Northern part of gr20 at the end of August?
From everything I've read it's still hard to understand what to expect - days are said to be hot, but what about nights (considering the altitude)?
Thanks!



Michele
moderator

Posted: Mon, Jul 6, 2015, 9:15

maarinsh,

At night on the northern section, temperatures can drop dramatically depending on weather. Example: this year, in June at Ciottulu de i Mori they had 11° C (in tent) and 7° C outside. But that happened during a period of frequent rainstorms.
You are right: it's hard to tell what to expect. I'd go with a 0° C (comfort temp) sleeping bag. But that's me because I'm usually cold at night.

--Michele



maarinsh

Posted: Mon, Jul 6, 2015, 10:01

Thanks, Michele, for the prompt answer!



GRRR 20

Posted: Sat, May 20, 2017, 7:44

I usually start by sleeping on top of my sleeping bag. If it gets a bit cold in the night, then I'll go inside it.



Backstroke

Posted: Mon, May 22, 2017, 4:16

I did not stay in the refuges but my friend who did complained of being cold a few nights in a few places. There is also a continual negotiation/ possible conflict of some who want the windows open during the night. I was there in June and it was never too cold outside, and inside of course will be warmer. I second Michele's recommendation of a 0 C. bag, but a 5 C may be fine.