Detailed Kit List and other guidance

gilesc

Posted: Thu, Sep 27, 2012, 17:13

I have posted on google docs my detailed kit list for the GR20.
It includes a detailed list of all equipment, including manufacturer links.
Also included are notes about fitness, options for sleeping, protection from bed bugs, washkit, first aid, the cost of food and budget, what sleeping bag etc etc.
Total kit weight 10kg including food and water.

Hope this is helpful to future trekkers.

Here it is:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AiN5jbIs7tQ6dEtQdE1kaUJld1d...

Giles



Michele
moderator

Posted: Thu, Sep 27, 2012, 21:31

A really excellent work, Giles. Thank you.



Joanna

Posted: Fri, Sep 28, 2012, 6:55

Nice job! I particulary liked the part about consulting you doctor before the trek, hehehe I guess you're american? :o) just joking:-)

Anyway, just one word of caution - one 1-liter water bottle is not enough! You cannot rely on the streams, you have to be prepared and take all the water you need from the refuge. For most people it means 3 liters, and for that you need three 1-liter bottles (or 2 1,5-liter ones)



gilesc

Posted: Fri, Sep 28, 2012, 8:31

Hi Joanna, yes, agree about the amount of water. I took a 1 litre bottle for drinking water and a water straw that I used at all stream-drinking opportunities. This way I only ever used about 1/2 of my 1 litre drinking water. Since the water (purifying) straw enables you to safely drink any water and only weighs about 40g, it was a real weight saver. Without it then I agree 2.5L is probably sensible. Will update the spreadsheet to highlight this.
The doctor recommendation is just to remind people that their health and safety is their own responsibility, rather than reading this info, running up and down hills and giving themselves heart failure due to not considering their suitability for such activities! Giles



gilesc

Posted: Fri, Sep 28, 2012, 8:42

Michele, if it prevents a few people taking 20Kg++ and therefore saves their holidays/knees from certain ruin then it's worth the effort. Same for the fitness advice.
I think the problem is that the GR20 has found it's way into one of those "things to do before you die" lists, however, without the correct preparation it was more like "things to do to ensure you die". I saw people carrying the most ridiculous kit. One of them had a guitar. Another had a dog with a rucksack strapped to it. Neither made it past the first stage, which was probably for the best, but what a terrible shame for them to be so poorly prepared that their holiday is spoiled. There were a couple of Germans who got stuck at the top of the second stage due to excessive weight packs and poor fitness. We had to get mountain rescue out, who stayed the night with them and they got airlifted out the next day by helicopter. All of this pain, misery and expense could have been easily avoided with a bit of sensible preparation. So this is the objective of the spreadsheet: to provide as much guidance from those of us who have been on the GR20 in a tick-box format to help those who haven't to enjoy their experience of the GR20.
Best regards, Giles



Turnertactics
moderator

Posted: Fri, Sep 28, 2012, 20:09

Giles

I tried to access the spreadsheet but Google Docs tells me "That is not a valid spreadsheet URL".

Any ideas why?

Alan

--

Alan



Turnertactics
moderator

Posted: Fri, Sep 28, 2012, 20:25

Giles

Ignore my previous message - I cut & paste both parts of the link and it works fine!

Sounds like a great list that needs some detailed consideration.

I'm now on a mission to get it down even more!

I like the midge net idea to guard against bed bugs. Very inventive.

Sorry to hear about the awful weather.

Alan

--

Alan



Turnertactics
moderator

Posted: Sat, Sep 29, 2012, 17:02

Giles

I've had a very interesting afternoon looking through your excellent kit list.
I really like the buck knife!
I do think there are some potential savings to be made though.
Rather than take a a solar charger, I think I'll take a pre-charged spare battery for the phone, camcorder and camera? I'm sure that it's a lot lighter than a solar charger.
Also rather than taking heavy dry bags I'm going to take a heavy duty bin bag instead. It worked fine in the Atlas Mouuntains earlier in the year and can be thrown away if it isn't needed.
Personally, I prefer my North Face zip-off trousers rather than the Rohan's as well. They're great for hiking and travelling and double up as shorts.
Lastly, I found some great carbon fibre poles on offer with Field & Trek at only £30. They only weigh 380 grams.

--

Alan



gilesc

Posted: Sun, Sep 30, 2012, 7:15

Hi Alan, thanks for your thoughts on this. Yes, the buck knife continues to get a lot of use even back in the UK - mostly for slicing the Corsican dried meat that I brought back with me.
Regarding the solar charger, mine comes with one of the batteries that you mention. It holds enough to charge the phone fully, twice. The trouble is that I use mine as a camera and for keeping in touch via text and email, so I was using 50+% of charge a day. The only solution was the solar charger. I was quite impressed with the weight of the powermonkey explorer and it just spent its time strapped to the top of my rucksack, charging the little battery pack. The total weight is about 165 grams for the solar panel and battery, so not too much extra to carry.
The dry bags were a kit-saver on several occasions. If you are lucky and don't get the terrible weather then I think you could get away with a plastic liner but I have always ended up ripping them. I am a bit of a tidy-fanatic, so I use the dry bags for keeping everything in order and being able to find anything at short notice. You could probably get away with fewer than I took!
I've not tried the North Face trousers but thanks for this recommendation - I will add as an option to the kit list.
The poles sound great. Are they strong? I saw quite a few broken poles along the GR20, although I think they were aluminium. Perhaps carbon fibre is stronger?
Thanks and best regards, Giles



Turnertactics
moderator

Posted: Sun, Sep 30, 2012, 11:32

Giles

After weighing a pair of light walking trousers and my Mountain Hardware shorts, they come in at 100g less than the zip-off's, so I might change my mind there!

The carbon fibre poles should be a lot stronger but I have only seen them in Sports Direct so can't really tell. If I buy some, I'll let you know.

Also for keeping things tidy, I use a couple of mesh bags. A big one for clothes and a small one for all the little bits and pieces such as wash kit & spare batteries. They only weigh a couple of grams.

I might get an Alpkit dry bag to use as carry on luggage on the plane instead of a non-waterproof gym bag. There shouldn't be any weight difference.

Alan

--

Alan



Joanna

Posted: Sun, Sep 30, 2012, 18:56

Although I agree it's very important not to overload, I wouldn't "scare" people so much by saying never take more than so and so much. It really depends on how fit you are. I carried about 16 kg, one week's worth of city clothes for subsequent corsican holiday included, and was perfectly OK with that, even if I'm only 158 cm high and weight 54 kg. My hubby carried his 18 kg just as effordlessly. You just have to make sure you train with 5 kg more then the intended weight, and then you should be OK.

That said, I also met some people carring 20+ kg packs leaving the trail after one or two days. So I guess it all boils down to how fit you are, and how much training you do before the trip.



gilesc

Posted: Sat, Feb 9, 2013, 1:41

Hey Joanna, yes, it's that time of year again! The kit list is mainly designed to prevent the large number of drop-outs that I saw in the first few days - mostly due to two factors:
1. not being fit enough
2. carrying too much weight
...and there were a fair few doing both of the above. There were definitely some ultra-fit and well experienced people who knew what they were doing and had no need of the kit list. Some of them have contributed to it's creation.
Hope you have a fun year of expeditions. We're off to hike the Haute Route this season, fairly early on. Should be fun! Take care, Giles



Joanna

Posted: Sat, Feb 9, 2013, 10:01

Hi Giles, good luck on the High Route! We're doing Tour du Mont Blanc this August. We'll stay in refuges this time, so I guess I won't be carring more then 10kg this time;o)



gilesc

Posted: Wed, Aug 6, 2014, 7:01

Thanks for all the emails about this - glad to hear it's so useful!



Gaffr

Posted: Wed, Aug 6, 2014, 12:04

Very Useful information for folks going to the island.
Regarding the information re alternatives etc. Having started on the route and finding either the first or second stage too tough perhaps, the Mare e Monti N can easily be reached, from either refuge d'Ortu dI u Piobbu or from Carozzu refuge using good downhill paths to reach Bontifatu where the Mare e Monti route can be joined....this gives a fine interesting less demanding route.

--

Gaffr



gilesc

Posted: Thu, Aug 14, 2014, 11:50

thanks Gaffr, will update accordingly!