Corte - L'Île-Rousse trail with large group

Agnieszka

Posted: Wed, Aug 21, 2013, 22:37

Hello Hikers,

Next year in September I'm about to organise a trip to Corsica for large group of people (16-28 y. old; 20-30 people). We want to taste corsican polyphonic music on Calvi Polyphonic Festival, but before it we're planning to reach L'Île-Rousse from Corte in 7 days, hiking of course. Because there is such a laconic information about this trail on web I'm looking for someone, who knows the trail and who is able to dispel some of my doubts.

1) Is it an appropriate trail for such a big group? Of course I undestrand we'll have to divide us in smaller groups just for comfort and safety; Does the trail require advanced hiking skills? Is it good marked?

2) Where are there campings along the trail? We're only interested in campings, not other options of accommodation. The trail consists of 8 stops: Corte-Refuge de la Sega-Corscia-Asco-Moltifao-Olmi Capella-Speloncato-L'Île-Rousse. I found campins in/near Corte, Sega, Corscia, Asco, Moltifao and L'Île-Rousse, but I'm still looking for some place to pitch our tents near Olmi Capello and Speloncato. Does anyone know anything about such?

3) In Poland (whence we're from) we have a regulation which says that any trips taking place above 1000 m above sea level has to be provided by local, hired mountain guide - so we just CAN'T do it on our own. Is there such a regulation in France? I've done some research about it and the answer I found is no, but no harm to ensure.

Thank you in advance for all you help.



Gaffr

Posted: Thu, Aug 22, 2013, 5:23

Hello,
It looks like an interesting route. The only part of your intended route, we were on the Mare a Mare Nord from Moriani, that I have travelled is from Corte, by the very fine Tavignano mule track, up to Sega refuge where we camped. The following day we went over Bocca a Arinella (fine views of the south flank of Monte Cintu) and down to Albertacce where there was no camping possible and the only accommodation was in the Gite. We then went higher to reach Col di Vergio and then to the west cost at Cargese. Corscia is a above Calacuccia which is at the far end of the lake which has the same name. I guess that Corcscia to the Asco would be the highest col on this route at around 1,800 mtrs? We only know Haut Ascu, from travelling the GR20, which is higher up the valley. The other villages that you would travel through are very small? possiibly not too much provision for camping groups?

FF Randonnee the organisation who produce the Topo Guides for Corse may be worth contacting.

WWW.ffrandonnee.fr ................ and also contact Parc naturel region de Corse PNRC

I have the 'entre mer et montagne' guide for Corse which gives details of five routes on the island.... but nothing regarding this one that you would like to travel. I purchased this guide in 2008 so I guess that it is a bit out of date now!

--

Gaffr



Turnertactics
moderator

Posted: Thu, Aug 22, 2013, 7:37

I'm sure the tourist information centre in Corte can help with camp site information:
http://www.corte-tourisme.com
email: corte.tourisme@wanadoo.fr

I've climbed in the French Alps where a guide isn't mandatory. Corsica, as a department of France, is no different. You don't need a guide.

It's interesting to hear that a guide is required in Poland. I'll bear that in mind if I visit the Tatra's.

--

Alan



Turnertactics
moderator

Posted: Thu, Aug 22, 2013, 8:31

Is this the route you intend to follow: http://corsica.forhikers.com/sentier-ile-rousse-corte

Described in the reverse direction:

1.L'Ile Rouse - Speloncato
2.Speloncato - Olmi Capella
3.Olmi Capella - Moltifao
4.Moltifao - Asco
5.Asco - Corscia
6.Corscia - Sega
7.Sega - Corte

It says there are not many budget accommodation possibilities along the route, just the campsites in Monticello, Vallica and Corte, gites in Berg de Cabane and Corscia, and refuge de la Sega. You can camp at the Refuge de la Sega and at Haut Ascu (Asco). That does still leave some gaps.

--

Alan



Gaffr

Posted: Thu, Aug 22, 2013, 12:53

That's good it is on the randonnee map...maybe even some sort of guide-book/topo guide?

However Haut Ascu camping isn't going to be much good for these folks since there is a difference of several Kls. between Ascu at around 600 mtrs. and Haut Ascu at 1400 mtrs.
It is good that there is a couple of camping sites beyond the ones that we know at Corte and Sega...I think the problem will be the numbers they talk about 20-30 persons and fitting that number into the wee hamlets might be a problem?
However interesting to hear of different routes.

--

Gaffr



Gaffr

Posted: Thu, Aug 22, 2013, 13:05

I was thinking about this itinerary at lunchtime. If combined with the first couple of days on the Mare e Monti then switching to sentier transhumance, I think it is, to reach refuge de Puscaghja, Col Vergio, the berg. Vacaccghia down to Sega and then onto this route sentier rousse-corte a very reasonable round trip could be accomplished with little demands on bus/train. Especially so if Ile-Rousse was the port of arrival/departure?
Maybe around ten days or so of walking?

--

Gaffr



Agnieszka

Posted: Thu, Aug 22, 2013, 14:25

Dear Gaffr and Turnertactics,

Thank you for all the help and tips!

Gaffr, according to your first message - yes, Corcscia to the Asco would be the highest col on this route at around 1,800 mtrs. That was the plan :) Other villages are quite small, but as I wrote before, I found camping accommodation near Sega, Corscia (u Monte Cintu), Asco (Camping Cabanella) and Moltifao (camping Tizarella), but nothing in Olm Capella and Speloncato. In Corte and Ile Rousse it isn't a problem of course. Trail seems to be very interesting, but today I found information that it's quite new and in huge part non-good-marked. And it really bothers me, because I'll have under my protection minor hikers and I'll have full responsibility for them.

Turnertactics, I'll definitely contact with information centre in Corte. And it's a good info that we don't need a guide, like in Poland. Let me explain: in Poland, when you are hiking above 1000mtrs OR in the national parks in ORGANISED group (a trip organised by tourist office, church, school, scouts, association and so one), independently on number of hikers, mountain guide is obligatory. If you're travelling on your own, just f.e. with your wife or children, this regulation doesn't concern you.

And yes, I found information about this trail on corsika.forhikers.com, but it seemed so laconic...

Dear Gaffr again, it's quite funny, because this afternoon I was also thinking about linking part of mentioned trail with sentier transhumance. The main part of our Corsica trip is to reach in easy way Calvi (for polyphonic festival) and turn back to Bastia. And Corte - Ile Rousse trail is good in that way, because we can go from Bastia to Corte by bus, walking, then from Ille Rousse to Calvi and from Calvi to Bastia same way. Only for walking we can reserve 7-8 days, not more. Maybe it's good idea to combine first days (Corte - Sega - Corscia) with transhumance (Corscia - Albertacce -Refuge de Puscaghia - Tuarelli - Bonifato - Calenzana). I've read it is well marked. Then from Calenzana to Calvi, simply. But same problems with campings...



Gaffr

Posted: Thu, Aug 22, 2013, 19:53

Hello A,
I can give to you my own experiences on the various place that you list.

Corscia I have never been there but you say that camping is fine there.

Albertacce we found no camping and had to stay at the gite.

Puscaghia I have only passed the sign pointing to this refuge on my way through to Ciotullo Mori from Col di Vergio this summer you would have to contact them regarding camping. It is a refuge so should be ok?

There is another gite on the trail before you reach Tuarelli down from Puscaghia.

We had a night under the stars at Bocca di Lucca coming from Bonifatu and had breakfast down in Tuarelli and I am sure that I was aware of folks camping there....That was in 2008.

We camped at Bonifatu on two occasions 2008 and 2009.

At Calinzana we camped there on three occasions.

So from what I can see your problem area would be at Albertacce.

--

Gaffr



Agnieszka

Posted: Fri, Aug 23, 2013, 0:09

Dear,

Thank you for sharing your experiences. Finally I solved all of my problems, I found even camping near Albertacce (in Lozzi, Camp. l'Arimone, just few km north). I modified our trail but it isn't a big modification, just for this special day. The rest of the trail seems to be OK, I found all of the needed contacts with campings. And I'm really excited now!

So all I need to do now is focus on the trail, maps, guides, ffrandonnee...

Thank you for all your help!



Gaffr

Posted: Fri, Aug 23, 2013, 10:32

Hello I managed to look at a large scale IGN map on line and Lozzi does not look to be too much of diversion. The other question is that on the map I looked at the Asco camping seems to be some way from the hamlet or maybe there is another camping that is not shown on the Map?
Maybe, after your trip along this trail, you get a post on here about how you found this route?

Good travelling

--

Gaffr



Agnieszka

Posted: Fri, Aug 23, 2013, 15:54

Hello,

We will continue our research about both of these trails, but for now the second (with Tuarelli, Bonifatu and Calenzana) seems to be more optimistic. Thank you!

Of course, I'll share our experiences after route, but it will happen next year.

One more question: is there a (safe) possibility to WALK from Calenzana to Calvi? We though about one more day on trail.

Thank you.



Gaffr

Posted: Fri, Aug 23, 2013, 16:17

Hello A,
I did walk down from Calinzana down to Calvi in June after coming along from Conca. I walked on a narrow-ish road from outside the Calinzana camping down towards Calvi. I walked for 3kls. or so....not much of a verge beside the road in places. A kind man, in his vehicle, on his way to another village to do some building work took me down to the main road into Calvi and then went in the opposite direction for his work. The road is broad ...several roundabouts to negotiate ...but with a path to walk on. A few more Kls into the town. It was early morning so it was reasonably cool. I was very ready for a coffee and pastry!
Six years ago we travelled on an afternoon bus from Calvi into Calinzana. When I asked at the Gite in Calinzana about a bus doing the reverse trip I was told that there was none.
It appears to be difficult going in this direction....o.k. when travelling alone but with a large group of folks much more difficult. I did hear of a path away from the road exiting from Calinzana but I didn't look for this. Maybe someone else on this site would know about this trail?

--

Gaffr



Michele
moderator

Posted: Mon, Sep 16, 2013, 16:14

Hi,

I know there is a path (away from the road) that can be walked, but I don't have first hand experience about it: I know about it because I've seen it on my map (it's the red trail).

Here is the link.
https://www.dropbox.com/s/fh1pffty4gfr3jv/route.jpg

Sorry if the resolution is low.

--Michele



Gaffr

Posted: Mon, Sep 16, 2013, 16:38

Hello Michele,
Thanks for that....I could have done with that knowledge in June. Walking down the road to reach the main road into Calvi would be a bit dangerous with a large group of folks. I found it quite difficult since there was not a decent verge all the way down. However I did get a lift from a Portugese man after a few Kls. and from where he dropped me off there is a good footpath all the way into Calvi.

It looks as if the path leaves the road that I followed down to the the wee church where Santa Restituda lies in a stone catafalque....it lies under the pulpit in an underground cavern....I guess I was fortunate that when I arrived to the church the gentleman was about to lock-up the building but he allowed me to get to the cavern....she was the first Christian martyr on the island.

--

Gaffr



Steve Dan

Posted: Wed, Apr 20, 2016, 15:43

Hello everyone.
On May 9th I'll be starting from the coast to walk the seemingly neglected Ille Rousse-Corte trail.Then, after an overnight at A Sega, I plan to link up with the Mare a Mare Nord variant at Soccia and onward from there to Vivario.
I'd be happy to read anything on either trail, especially first hand info.
Steve.