GR20 with restricted use of one hand?

Kevski

Posted: Tue, Aug 25, 2015, 15:47

Hello All

My partner and I are planning to walk the route in the 2nd/3rd week of Sept. About 8 weeks ago she fell when out running and fractured one bone in her right hand in 3 places. Plaster cast is now removed and physio is underway.

The physio (not a walker/scrambler) is not very encouraging about heading off on the GR20. Both of us want to go of course, so we have a dilemma. To help make the decision, I want to ask this question of as many people as I can:

From your recollection / knowledge of the route, how often is it necessary to use your hands for climbing or scrambling uphill or downhill?
# Every day?
# Several times every day?
# Only on a few occasions?
# Other?

Without full use of both hands, would it be too much of a challenge? We are both climbers, in our 50's and reasonably fit.

Btw, the physio would be worried about constant use of a walking pole….

Thanks in advance for your responses...

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Kevin



Gaffr

Posted: Wed, Aug 26, 2015, 6:39

Hello,
Quickly, off the top of my head, if you start in North....Calinzana up to Piobbu refuge there is scrambling for a stretch after bocca a u Saltu up to near where you can see the refuge...in the distance.
On day two a lot of up and down scrambling and on day three scrambling after crossing the bridge near Carozzu but maybe more of a strain could be the descent to Haut Ascu on the path?
What about beginning from the South, perhaps a more gentle first couple of days, to see 'how it goes' on the trail. Maybe avoid the Bavella traverse, on day two, and take the lower trail to get to Asinau. On day three from the South, there is some easier scrambling on the trail after Cuscionne before reaching Usciolu refuge. Should be fine all the way through to Vizzavona....maybe avoiding the Monte Renosa top. I can recall a bit of scrambling on the rocks close to the lake before reaching the higher ground.....but maybe avoidable? After six days you will know how things are going.
One walking pole, in the good hand, better than none!
There are several places where it is possible to transfer to another of the Corsican trails.

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Gaffr



Kevski

Posted: Wed, Aug 26, 2015, 11:25

Thanks Gaffr.

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Kevin



Turnertactics
moderator

Posted: Wed, Aug 26, 2015, 13:34

Kevin

There are some sections that have chains fitted to aid ascent or descent so using both hands on those is obviously better. If using one hand, she would need to find a suitable foot placement before moving her good hand up or down the chain. The chains are generally there as aids to walkers, however, and are not always needed by anyone with scrambling experience unless it's wet, which it could well be in mid September.

Most of the chain sections are in the north but there is one stretch of chain going over the Alpine route on the Aiguilles de Bavella as Gaffr says. It protects a tricky slab that would be difficult to pass without pulling hard on the chain. You can bypass that and take the low level route instead.

There is a lot of scrambling all along the GR20, usually for short stretches several times most days. The route accross Capitellu probably has the most scrambling now that the Cirque de la Solitude has been closed. You'll know long before you get there, going in either direction, if it's do-able.

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Alan



Kevski

Posted: Thu, Aug 27, 2015, 12:51

Thanks Alan.

We plan to give it a go and hope for a good outcome :-)

Kevin

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Kevin