Gearlist for GR20

hijk

Posted: Sun, Apr 24, 2016, 19:11

Hi,

I think it would be interesting and helpful for hikers trying to prepare their GR20 trek to see some gear lists of what people bring on the trail in order to pack smart.

I'm starting in Conca June 14th.

Here's my list so far: https://lighterpack.com/r/ecojrv

Feel free to share yours.



Gaffr

Posted: Sun, Apr 24, 2016, 19:50

Hello,
If you look around the Forum Topics there have been several folks who have contributed interesting gear lists for the GR20.

--

Gaffr



Bruce the Kiwi

Posted: Mon, Apr 25, 2016, 2:38

This is a pretty good list.
I am going in June with a Big Sky Wisp 1 person tent weighing just 567g and a Sea to Summit inflatable mat at 350g. I am squeezing everything into a smaller 33 Osprey Talon by using a compression drybag for the sleeping bag.
But then I am adding weight back with a little gas bottle and stove.
I also plan to be well prepared for the storms that can strike in the afternoon - I want to pack light but not at the risk of dying of exposure. A decent waterproof jacket and trousers with gloves, wooly hat and layers of merino wool.
I also plan to carry a Lifestraw to drink from dubious water sources.

--

Kiwi Bruce
"Feeling LOW?
Go on mountains.”
― Prajakta Mhadnak



Gaffr

Posted: Mon, Apr 25, 2016, 9:13

Hello,
Amazing light and very organized....7 and bit kilograms.
A lot of very light.....expensive? kit.
I kind of wish I could travel with such a weight on my back....getting a bit old for lugging around heavy loads.
I printed out to have a look closely and maybe later look on line at some of the stuff that I haven't come across.
I take it that you will use the outside gas stoves at the Refuges? for cooking meals...I don't see a stove in the list of kit.
Trail Runners shoes? When coming from South, on Monte Alculdina I met four folks in running shoes who obviously had been travelling fast and were close to the end at Conca.
All of the shoes worn were in tatters and were bound up with all sorts of material, their legs were in a ravaged state etc. and they were awaiting the arrival of a fifth companion on the summit who was perhaps struggling.
The trail on the GR20 is rough and unlike possibly most other trails.
Maybe an extra pair of trainers should be added to the list.:-)

--

Gaffr



Bruce the Kiwi

Posted: Mon, Apr 25, 2016, 11:51

Hi Gaffr

At 60 I am suffering the same problem with heavy loads - advancing years :-)
Preparing for this year's GR20 south I have blown some of the grandkid's inheritance on some new lightweight kit. Including these goretex Salomon Trail Runners which are a step up from your normal sneakers.

http://www.outdoorgearlab.com/Trail-Running-Shoes-Reviews/Salomon-XA-Pro-3D

I completed the South in 2007 in hiking boots. I suffered massive blisters on my heels and both my big toes turned black and eventually fell off.
Returning to complete the north in 2009 I wore an earlier model of Salomon Trail Runners which held together fine and caused no feet problems at all.

I have a theory that serious trail shoes like the Salomons can be ideal if combined with a light pack - less than say 10kg all up including food, water and fuel. Light pack - light feet.
Heavier than 10kg and you probably do need boots with ankle support.

But then my hiking style is slow-and-careful rather than fast-and-furious, and this probably helps preserve my shoes, as well as my knees, etc.

I agree about the stove - breakfast coffee - hot lunch - nice cuppa - hot dinner even if you arrive too late at the refuge. Worth the 300-400g extra weight.
cheers
Bruce

--

Kiwi Bruce
"Feeling LOW?
Go on mountains.”
― Prajakta Mhadnak



Bruce the Kiwi

Posted: Mon, Apr 25, 2016, 11:52

Correction - the toe NAILS fell off - I still have the toes.

--

Kiwi Bruce
"Feeling LOW?
Go on mountains.”
― Prajakta Mhadnak



Gaffr

Posted: Mon, Apr 25, 2016, 12:19

Hello,
I can give you a few years B the Kiwi....in my case 70 + 3.
Just looking at the 'running shoes' I have always taken a pair of Salomons, not unlike those in the advert, for changing into in the evening at the camp. :-)

--

Gaffr



Gaffr

Posted: Mon, Apr 25, 2016, 12:43

Hello to hijk,
Had a look over your list/weights etc.
Two obvious things that would add to your pack-weight....add on 2kgs. for the water bottle filled up at the start of the day and what about food to be carried?
So perhaps the pack-weight will be closer to at least 10kgs.
What have I missed?

--

Gaffr



obrobinson

Posted: Mon, Apr 25, 2016, 13:16

Hi Bruce,

I've done the entire GR20 north to south four times, each occasion wearing La Sportiva Trango S Evo size 47 (1.8 kg). On one of these times I did the trail with a friend wearing lightweight trail shoes. The path is very rough and stony/rocky for most of its duration and so with their soles' high degree of flexibility I was not surprised that after 12 days my walking companion said that he wished he'd chosen a pair of boots because eventually each pebble was felt underfoot. If as you say you describe your pace as sloe this effect could well be magnified. A boot also generally has a more robust toe-box fir when a rock is invariably 'kicked'.

Oliver



Bruce the Kiwi

Posted: Mon, Apr 25, 2016, 14:46

Hi Oliver

I was on the GR20 in June 2009 when Kilian Jornet bounded past me in his Salomons, on his way to setting a new record of under 33 hours for the GR20. Of course Kilian was only carrying about one or two kilos of kit.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ShLApMxFbX4

On the same 2009 trip I met a chap with a big heavy pack and ordinary-looking sneakers. He had rolled his foot and fractured some bones. I kept him company until the helicopter arrived.

So I completely agree that a hiker with a normal pack needs solid boots.

My 700g Salomons can only work as part of an ultra light philosophy, along with the 33l 900g pack, 567g tent, 350g mat, etc. They have a pretty solid sole and good toe protection.

This review calls them "a burly tank of a shoe that will protect your foot absolutely anywhere".

http://www.outdoorgearlab.com/Trail-Running-Shoes-Reviews/Salomon-XA-Pro-3D

Of course as we know the GR20 is not like absolutely anywhere - let's hope I will be okay :-)

cheers

Bruce

--

Kiwi Bruce
"Feeling LOW?
Go on mountains.”
― Prajakta Mhadnak



Bruce the Kiwi

Posted: Mon, Apr 25, 2016, 14:58

You are an inspiration, Gaffr sir.
I hope I can enjoy another dozen or more years of good hiking.

--

Kiwi Bruce
"Feeling LOW?
Go on mountains.”
― Prajakta Mhadnak



Basia

Posted: Sat, Apr 30, 2016, 15:25

Hi,

I also want to have a very light backpack, I want no more than 7 kg (without water and food). I don't take a tent or a mat or a stove. Only the very essential and lightweigth things: a sleeping bag in a compression drybag, only a few extra warm clothes, sunglasses, sunscreen, money, ID, Phone, small camera.
I guess my EHBO-kit will add some weight... (but I will look for only a few things in repacked small bottles)
I will do the hike with light hiking boots (something like these: http://shopeu.ecco.com/uk/en/ecco/ecco-ulterra-ladies_3957999/5340333?na...
I bought them when I was trekking in Norway when I had very painful feet.)

But still I'm afraid for blisters and blue toe nails.. I tried already 2 pair of socks, good cream, compeed.. but still. It's so annoying! So, if someone has the ultimate hint? ;)

Thanks!

--

Barbara



Bruce the Kiwi

Posted: Sat, Apr 30, 2016, 16:08

Hi Barbara
The inner socks should be thin Coolmax.The boots or shoes slightly on the large side and well worn in over several months.
The only problem with no tent and matt is that you have to rely on getting into a refuge or refuge tent every night. I suggest you book ahead and take earplugs too for the snoring.
Happy trails
Bruce

--

Kiwi Bruce
"Feeling LOW?
Go on mountains.”
― Prajakta Mhadnak



Basia

Posted: Sat, Apr 30, 2016, 16:27

hey Bruce,

Yes I booked already all the nights! I know I will have less flexibility and freedom but for me the weight was more important to spare my back.. ;)
mm, good to take some earplugs too.
I have liners and hiking socks from icebreaker, my shoes are already worn some years.

So, I will see how it will go! Besides the physical challenge the most important will be the pleasure to be in the mountains and enjoy the beauty of nature!

A happy trail too!

--

Barbara



Bruce the Kiwi

Posted: Thu, May 5, 2016, 0:05

Hi All

Here's my list for the South in late June. Total of 6.5kg before food, water and fuel.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/2ma1jrqf825ol7n/Bruces%20GR20%20Pack%20List.xl...

What have I missed?

Many thanks

Bruce

--

Kiwi Bruce
"Feeling LOW?
Go on mountains.”
― Prajakta Mhadnak



Hugh92

Posted: Fri, May 6, 2016, 11:50

Hi Bruce,

Your list looks good.

The main thing that I can see really is your reliance on being able to get a Coleman C100 Gas Cartridge when you arrive. Is your stove compatible with other cartridges?

It looks to me that if for whatever reason you can't get your Coleman cartridge (or even a last-minute alternative one) you have ~800g of dehydrated food you can't eat without using a refuge's facilities. Which in turn would make lunch difficult as you could only have lunch by stopping by a refuge en route!

Another thing, your Macpac merino fleece looks a little on the chunky side to say the least (495g). Have you considered taking two lighter fleeces instead? Two layers are better than one!

Hope I've been of help!

Hugh



Bruce the Kiwi

Posted: Fri, May 6, 2016, 12:50

Hi Hugh

It is a good point about the gas bottle.
I am counting on finding one in Nice, Toulon, Ajaccio or Vizzavona.
If not I may have to to buy and carry a heavier French camping gaz stove and cylinder.
Also my meals will rehydrate with cold water - just not as nice to eat.

Yep the Macpac merino is a heavy top - I will reconsider this.

Many thanks

Bruce

--

Kiwi Bruce
"Feeling LOW?
Go on mountains.”
― Prajakta Mhadnak



Turnertactics
moderator

Posted: Fri, May 6, 2016, 19:14

Bruce

A lightweight down jacket will add more warmth for the weight. I always take one as an emergency layer and top it off with a waterproof layer if its windy.

--

Alan



Francesco

Posted: Sat, May 7, 2016, 17:06

Hi Barbara,

have you tried Smart Wool socks. I bought the at Cotswold Outdoors in UK. They're really good. Also I bought some microporous tape from Boots. 3M makes it too. Much cheaper than Compeeds and very effective. Takes a while to wrap it round your toes at 6 am. I massaged my feet with nivea after the shower at the end of each day.

One advice: walk a lot with your gear before you go and tape your feet while doing so.

have a nice walk

Francesco

--

checco



Gaffr

Posted: Sun, May 8, 2016, 4:25

Hello,
There is no substitute for just getting out and walking all day, in rough, hilly terrain with a full rucksack containing the 'stuff' you will take with you including 2 litres of fluids which are needed most days in Corse. :-)

--

Gaffr



Bruce the Kiwi

Posted: Sun, May 8, 2016, 9:15

Thanks Alan and Hugh

I am now contemplating adding a 200g Macpac uberlight down vest and replacing the 495g Macpac fleece with a lighter long sleeved merino top at 200g.

Bruce

--

Kiwi Bruce
"Feeling LOW?
Go on mountains.”
― Prajakta Mhadnak



Turnertactics
moderator

Posted: Sun, May 8, 2016, 19:50

Bruce

That sounds like a good plan. If your core temperature is toasty and warm, you'll be fine. Your X pot looks interesting. I'll have to have a look at one of those. I just bought a 1L 'boundless voyage' heat-exchanger pan from Ebay for £13. It boils 0.5L of water in just less than 2 minutes and weighs in at 210g plus 60g for the lid but it should save that much on the weight of gas needed.

--

Alan



Hugh92

Posted: Mon, May 16, 2016, 11:48

Here is my list so far: https://lighterpack.com/r/5fgwzy

I'd really appreciate it if people could tell me if I'm missing something crucial?

My other query is regarding Trail shoes and hiking boots. Are trail shoes a viable option for the GR20?

Are there any particular Trail shoe you could recommend that will last the GR20 and will also fit rather wide feet?

Thanks in advance!

Best regards,

Hugh

(P.s The items marked with a red star on my kit-list are items I've yet to buy.)



GRRR 20

Posted: Mon, May 16, 2016, 14:50

I wore boots the first time I trekked the GR20. Never again! I wore shoes the next time, and wore lightweight trekking shoes last time. At 635g for a pair, there's no going back to boots!

You don't have a weight for money. You'll have to carry all your money, unless you intend leaving the route to get some more, which will cost you a whole day. It won't weigh much, but you won't be going anywhere without it!



Hugh92

Posted: Mon, May 16, 2016, 20:18

Noted!

What is the brand/model of the lightweight trekking shoe you speak of? :)



Bruce the Kiwi

Posted: Mon, May 16, 2016, 21:23

My Salomon XA Pro 3D GTX Shoes weigh about 900g. I would be a little hesitant about lighter shoes.

--

Kiwi Bruce
"Feeling LOW?
Go on mountains.”
― Prajakta Mhadnak



GRRR 20

Posted: Tue, May 17, 2016, 8:53

Inov8 Roclite 295s do everything I want my footwear to do in the mountains, but there's no point asking what anyone else wears. You have to find something that works for you.



gundars

Posted: Tue, May 17, 2016, 10:35

Correct, but I guess the choice depends a lot how heavy load should be taken. I like trail runners very much, but last year in Pyrenees with some 15kg backpack Salomon X-ultras felt too light for long downhill stretches on loose scree. Now considering Salomon Quest 4d, about 1kg per pair though.



Michele
moderator

Posted: Tue, May 17, 2016, 13:09

I agree. For climbing up, running shoes would be the best, but the problem is when going downhill. A running shoe is too light and gives zero ankle support, plus the terrain is so bad that I don't feel safe in shoes. But, like GRRR20 said, everyone has to find what works for them.



Backstroke

Posted: Sat, May 21, 2016, 1:41

Some comments about footwear: Just about everyone in California on the long hikes use the trail runners, with all different weights of packs and different trails, even off-trail in very tough conditions. A range of padding and stiffness is available. Some even come with "rock plates" that make them particularly stiff under the sole. Generally you can wear them comfortably from day one, and once you get used to their lightness and ability to breathe, there is no returning to boots. The use of two socks is old-school; almost everyone uses one pair of smartwool or darn tough socks. Two socks bind up. While waterproof or "GTX" boots might be nice if you are taking a smallish walk in a puddled area, over a prolonged period of rain your feet will get wet no matter what. Once that happens, those nice waterproof shoes stay wet much longer. So most prefer non-waterproof runners. "Ankle support" is mostly about how snugly the shoes fit to your ankles, so most don't go with the high-tops. I like La Sportiva Wildcats and TX3's, both of which have plenty of stiffness. They are all good, and it really just depends on how they fit you, and your preferred stiffness.



Michele
moderator

Posted: Fri, May 20, 2016, 8:39

I don't know about "specific" American shoes (the ones you mention with different padding, stiffness or those with rock plates): I know some of those available in Europe like Innov8 or Merrel's. I looked into them, though never tried them personally (maybe in future I will). They are all shoes **meant** for running or approach. Very lightweight. For what they are meant don't offer much padding, tend to be very flexible and as a result walking on uneven/rough terrain means feeling all the rocks and stones and in general there is more fatigue for the feet.
Also I personally give much value to the rebuked ankle support maybe because I personally don't have much strength in my ankles and as a consequence they tend to bend sideways easily. But the truth is I like padded footwear, my feet feel more protected and I feel safer in going downhill with a robust footing.

Now that said if I had to walk the PCT or other similar trail I too would buy running shoes.

No doubt if running shoes are the new way to go to the mountains, in the next few years the good old fashioned boots will start to disappear from the stores.

--Michele



Backstroke

Posted: Sat, May 21, 2016, 1:40

Michele, for trail runners, I would recommend that you try out the La Sportiva Wildcat. It is their most padded shoe. It does not have the "rock plate" but I am very satisfied with its stiffness walking over rocky terrain, and I am perhaps more sensitive than most to small rocks. It is very high-tech; the throat of the shoes grabs the ankle amazingly well and may take care of your ankle concerns.

The Merrel Moab may be the most popular shoe. It is not really a trail runner, it is slightly heavier, bulkier, and does not breathe as well, but is still the kind of lightweight shoe that is easy on the feet and does not need to be broken in.

The Salomons are also very popular. We have noticed that the upper has a tendency to tear where the foot bends.

The Brooks Cascadias have become stiffer and were one of the most popular shoes on the PCT a few years ago, but they made some changes to how they fit the foot and many loyal fans abandoned it.

You know that you have a true breathable trail runner when you see how dirty your feet are at the end of the day! I mean really really dirty!



Michele
moderator

Posted: Sat, May 21, 2016, 5:54

Thanks for your recommendations Backstroke! I'll try LaSportiva Wildcat as you suggest (I needed some approach shoes anyway). I see they are at version 3. I hope they are good for my feet.

--Michele



Backstroke

Posted: Sat, May 21, 2016, 6:30

They don't advertise the Wildcats as approach shoes; the TX3 is a new hybrid trail/approach shoe.
I did not mention that I also insert an orthotic so that the arch fits me perfectly. The throat of the shoe rides high on the ankle, so I don't really feel any loss by elevating slightly high in the shoe.



Michele
moderator

Posted: Sat, May 21, 2016, 7:55

You're right. It is advertised as DESIGNED FOR OFF-ROAD RUNNING, IDEAL FOR TRAINING SESSIONS & LONGER RUNS. http://www.sportiva.com/products/footwear/mountain-running/wildcat-30

On the same site they differentiate between footwear for mountain, hiking/backpacking and running.
So this shoe may be a substitute for proper hiking boots, but still I feel it's like wanting to push the envelope.

I'll look into it.

--Michele



Andeblonde

Posted: Sun, May 22, 2016, 21:43

Hi, I know this isn't exactly to do with kit, but what do you do about water? I am wanting to do the route this summer camping and bringing all my own food from the start (in ration pack things). I was hoping to find a stream each day, fill up my bottle and then sterilise it. Is that proposal realistic?

Thanks a lot

Andreas

--

Ande



Francesco

Posted: Mon, May 23, 2016, 4:41

Hi Ande, I have a Katadyne Pocket which is very handy. Last June I used it a lot on Tour du Mont Blanc where water was plenty. On GR20 North in 2014 it was always bad weather and so thirst wasn't an issue.
I think it is an extra safety item and allows you to carry less weight. It is heavy though. You could try the Katadyne My Bottle which comes with a filter and is quite light.

Bye

Francesco

--

checco



Francesco

Posted: Mon, May 23, 2016, 19:06

Hi Hugh,

have you considered a multi fuel stove. I flew my Optimus Nova Plus into Calvi with an empty stove and filled it up at the gas station which is 3 minutes walk from Calenzana gite d'etape. I paid a bit over 100 quid.

Good trekking

Francesco

--

checco



Gaffr

Posted: Mon, May 23, 2016, 19:09

That's an expensive fuel fill up. :-)

--

Gaffr



Backstroke

Posted: Wed, Jun 1, 2016, 17:38

Hi Michele. Regarding the trail runners, you might also want to look at the Wildcat 3.0, which is some kind of update of the Wildcat, but also the Ultra Raptor, because it is listed as having a rock plate in the sole. One definitely walks differently with trail runners, you chose your steps more carefully. That may sound like a liability but it is not; because the trail runners tend to cling to rocks a bit better. There is more finesse and less brute force than with a traditional shoe. But at any rate the Ultra Raptor may be an easier transition for you.



Michele
moderator

Posted: Wed, Jun 1, 2016, 18:12

Thanks Backstroke, either one I definitely have to try them on and see what my feet feel like (although I fear for my ankles 'cause they tend to twist sideways way too easily).

--Michele