Vegetarian food

santaci

Posted: Sun, Dec 4, 2016, 15:01

Hi folks, we're thinking of doing GR20 in June, any thoughts, etc. on availability of veggie food? Ideally we'd want to take a sleeping bag and refuge it, but can camp / cook if needs be. We've been spoilt by the great food on GR 5 and 54 so not exactly sure what to expect.



Gaffr

Posted: Sun, Dec 4, 2016, 16:47

Hello,
I camp and cook when in the GR20 so my knowledge of good eating places is limited to mostly the cols encountered on the route.
Haut Ascu, Auberge U vallone, Castel di Vergio, Vizzavona, U Renosa, Bocca di Verdi, Bergeries Croci and at the restaurant in Bavella. You will find good food and a choice in each of these locations.
I occasionally have breakfast....cheese, bread and coffee at a bergerie on the trail after the overnight.

The refuge areas during the peak times are very busy so it looks like a bit of a scramble to get everyone served at meal times. I guess that he shear numbers of folks mean that the choice will be very limited.
At the GR20 Refuges you will mostly get some pasta and vegetables....not up to the standard of food found on the French mainland locations on say the GR55 through the Vanoise.
My visits were in 2007, 2008 and in 2013 so maybe the food available has improved since then?

--

Gaffr



Michele
moderator

Posted: Sun, Dec 4, 2016, 16:48

Hi santaci,
do not expect any "great" food in the GR20 refuges (except maybe those listed by Gaffr). This trail is very basic under many aspects. If you read the trip reports in other threads you'll find out many people are not so satisfied with the food quality and choice, while others say it's just ok. So I'm not sure if a vegetarian could have an easy life on this trail.

--Michele



GRRR 20

Posted: Tue, Dec 6, 2016, 7:51

It is very difficult to maintain a vegetarian diet on the GR20. At the refuges there is rarely a choice of meals, and a lot of the dishes have meat already mixed into them. I noticed that when people asked for vegetarian alternatives, the answer was either 'non', or something very basic and unappealing was provided. The first vegetarian I ever met on the route simply gave up being vegetarian for two weeks - because it was easier. You either have to carry veggie food, or try and make something worth eating from the supplies they sell at the refuges. If you eat at the hotels, you get more choice, but even then, if all the choices contain meat, the only option is to try and negotiate with the staff.



santaci

Posted: Fri, Dec 9, 2016, 16:56

Hmmm. Thanks folks, I've spoken to another friend who knew a vegan walker who gave up and ate meat on the trail. Looks like a few bags of flavoured couscous are going in the packs.



grcotedazur20

Posted: Sun, Dec 25, 2016, 1:10

Hey. I heard a British vegetarian teenager kind of complaining to her parents about the choices. My thought was that she should just skip being a vegetarian for a couple of weeks. Normally I only eat poultry and fish. But I ate the Corsican sausage and some lamb couscous etc. My thought is that I'm only doing it once and these are local specialties. It's going like going native. There is cheese on the trail. It might be possible to ask if they can substitute eggs for meat or something like that. But don't count on it.



Backstroke

Posted: Fri, Jan 13, 2017, 7:08

I went in 2016 and I did not have any trouble eating vegetarian. Several places made a version of their dish without meat to accommodate me and others. Rarely did I feel like I missed out on what the others had. As has been said, the food for the most part is very basic, food is not the highlight of this trip. You can also supplement with purchases at several of the refuges: tinned salads that are surprisingly good, fruit, odd items. i would not worry about it.