Tent for GR20

MrFaulty

Posted: Mon, Jan 23, 2017, 23:49

Hi, I am taking my own tent on the GR20 and from my research, this really needs to be a free standing tent - is this correct?

Cheers
Ben



Michele
moderator

Posted: Tue, Jan 24, 2017, 7:02

This is not mandatory, but given the nature of the terrain (very hard soil), it will help, because you won't be forced to pitch any pegs on a windless night.

Michele

EDIT:
What I would recommend is to bring along a lot of extra guy ropes to secure the tent to big stones, rocks or bushes should your pegs fail.



MrFaulty

Posted: Tue, Jan 24, 2017, 21:43

Thanks - sounds like it might be worth the investment as my current tent requires pegging even for the base



Gaffr

Posted: Wed, Jan 25, 2017, 7:22

Hello,
Not had anything to do with the use of a 'pop-up tent'....but are there any points in the design of these to which you could attach para-cord to for more stability on a windy pitch?
My own tent has inner and outer pegging points that are very useful especially so on windy nights.
Yes as Michele says there are challenging places on the GR20 on where a tent can be pitched...Carozzu, Capanelle and at Prati that I have avoided both times since is it exposed to a wind...very open area and at the hard ground at Usciolu. Each of these difficult places I had my extra 'cords' which after being attached I simply rolled them up around a suitable block of stone....no problems.

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Gaffr



GRRR 20

Posted: Wed, Jan 25, 2017, 12:55

I have used a freestanding tent and a tent with lots of pegging points. It is easier to pitch a freestanding tent because when you need to use lots of pegs, sometimes it is difficult to get the legs in where you want.

There is no need to suffer while camping at Capanelle. The spaces at Fugone are horrible, but the camping area at the nearby Renosu building is one of the best on the GR20. Fugone gets too busy, but Renosu is always quiet.



MrFaulty

Posted: Fri, Jan 27, 2017, 3:47

Thanks everyone for the comments, very much appreciated.



OnTheSocks

Posted: Sat, Jan 28, 2017, 16:24

One more thing to add to the advise of bringing a free standing tent: When hiking the GR20 in 2014, I was very happy to have a tent which had a rather round / square shaped base. Reason is, at a couple of refuges there is not too much space for individual tents anyway, so a tunnel type tent will often be too long for the available flat spots.

Also, I consider a ground sheet mandatory - otherwise you're risking damage to your tent base on hard ground & little sharp stones.

OtS



Gaffr

Posted: Sat, Jan 28, 2017, 17:39

I would agree with GR20 regarding the welcoming U Renosu refuge.
In 2013 coming from the South after wet night camping at Col de Verdi followed by a wet day walking to Capanelle. After a quick coffee there I found out that U Renosu was functioning as a refuge once again. So booked in there for a night and was able to dry all my wet kit before proceeding on to Vizzavona.
The only time that I have used a refuge on the GR20....a good experience.

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Gaffr



MrFaulty

Posted: Mon, Jan 30, 2017, 4:24

Thanks!



Fanta 65

Posted: Mon, Jan 30, 2017, 4:50

Hi Ben,
we used last year a three person tunnel tent in the southern part. We were ok with the size of the places and with pitching it. We were very happy to have a wind-resisting tent as we had very windy nights. We didn't camp at U Fugone. The places there are really small. For pitching our tent, we had titan rock pins (additional to our normal pegs). The normal y-pegs are not useful for the GR 20. We were also happy about our footprint.

Frank

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Fanta 65



MrFaulty

Posted: Mon, Jan 30, 2017, 4:57

Thanks Frank, I did a quick google on these Titan Rock pins but cannot find then, can you post a picture of them or a link to where I can see and/or buy them?

Thanks
Ben



Fanta 65

Posted: Tue, Jan 31, 2017, 4:33

Hi Ben,

look for stinger titan hilleberg. They are quiet expensive but very useful. Perhaps you are able to find cheaper ones.

Good luck and a nice day
Frank

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Fanta 65



MrFaulty

Posted: Tue, Jan 31, 2017, 4:45

Thanks, wow, not wrong, I was expecting expensive but that is taking it to a whole new level! Think I might try Outwell Tarzan Rock pegs first - then when they fail, go and spend the bick bucks!



JimJones

Posted: Sun, Mar 18, 2018, 19:38

I always find the pegs that come with a tent aren't really up to much. But there's loads of alternatives on the market. Here's a list of about 10 for all sorts of different terrains and budgets https://effortlessoutdoors.com/best-tent-stakes/