Cirque de la Solitude: the mountain guides want to challenge the ban to cross it

Michele
moderator

Posted: Mon, Jul 10, 2017, 16:33

Money, money, money. Since the Cirque was a big attraction for their clients the guides are in revolt because of their diminuished income. So they have decided to challenge the ban.

http://france3-regions.francetvinfo.fr/corse/haute-corse/centre-corse/ci...



Gaffr

Posted: Tue, Jul 11, 2017, 5:43

Hello Michele,
I understood from what I had read about the Cirque following the horrific events in 2015 that if mountaineering kit was taken that the cirque was accessible. I have obviously misunderstood what has been said.
I do know that all? of the kit that made the Cirque possible for walkers has been stripped out. So the reality of this is that walkers with heavy rucksacks on the GR20 would just not have the capacity to carry the extra kit to enable security in the Cirque.
I guess that the local guides would be well placed for taking folks through? Probably seeing their clients down into the Cirque then up to the exit Bocca then showing them the direction to get to Tighuettu refuge.
Many will feel that after what happened that the Cirque is still an area of 'un-recovered' walkers, still as far as I know, buried under the debris and would not want to go into that area?
Additionally the report from the geologists regarding the instability of the rock debris has to be taken into account.

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Gaffr



Gaffr

Posted: Tue, Jul 11, 2017, 6:49

Hello,
My attempt to translate some of the newspaper report.
Very roughly....the gentleman from the Restaurant in Haut Ascu does say that trade at his business has diminished? and yet from what everyone says of the GR20 that the numbers of walkers continues to rise?
Most of us are aware that the refuges are much busier? with walkers.
Maybe there is another group of folks who in the days when the Cirque was perhaps done as a day walk from the car park at Haut Ascu were additional clients of the restaurant and could it be that these day-walkers spent more in the restaurant than many of the walkers between Stage 3 and stage 4 on the jairvan?
Look at it another way one might think that the opening up of the route up to Monti Cintu with some aid cables/markings etc. would be just as much an attraction to the casual non GR20 walking folks?

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Gaffr



Michele
moderator

Posted: Tue, Jul 11, 2017, 7:19

Roger,
the way I see it it's only a matter of business. It's not a request of "freedom". The guides were making more money when di Cirque was open. Period.



GRRR 20

Posted: Tue, Jul 11, 2017, 7:51

If it's just about money, then I would be happy for the guides to make money out of paying clients, but I would also insist that they pay for any rescues when things go wrong. The guides are probably in the best position to get people through safely, as far as guiding goes. They don't have any control over rockfalls, so that's always going to count against them. The problem is that if they're allowed through, then others who are less experienced might follow. When I was last at Asco, the Cirque was closed and the place was busier than I ever saw it in the previous ten years. Someone is making money!



Michele
moderator

Posted: Tue, Jul 11, 2017, 8:17

GRRR20, it's not a matter of who makes money. I have nothing against it. To me safety comes first and, like you said, nobody can be in control of rockfalls.
Their argument is: that's the intrinsic nature of mountains, everyone take their chances because on the mountains the zero risk doesn't exist. But then they pretend to ignore that when something happens other people - the rescuers - are forced to risk their lives to save others or search those gone missing. And from what I have read there have been 4 interventions already to rescue hikers gone lost in the Cirque. So the ban is a very serious issue.
But I believe that in the long run, after all this pressure the authorities will end up lifting the ban.

For money's sake.



GRRR 20

Posted: Tue, Jul 11, 2017, 8:33

I would prefer that they stayed out of the Cirque, but if they really want to go in there, then I expect them to accept full responsibility for everyone's safety, pay the full cost for any rescue, and in the event of anyone's death, to accept whatever punishment the law requires, without making any excuses. No-one is going to build a wall or a fence around it, and no-one is going to pay for 24 hour patrols, and as we already know, some people are going there anyway.



river_paolo

Posted: Thu, Jul 13, 2017, 10:57

Hei!
What about of doing a trek in Corsica?

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Paolo