Randoblog update

karkulin771

Posted: Fri, Apr 20, 2018, 15:20

hello when the update randoblog I wrote an email to adminblogpnrc@gmail.com and so far unanswered. Do you have any information about snow conditions on GR 20.



Gaffr

Posted: Fri, Apr 20, 2018, 15:58

Hello,
I too wrote to the PNRC folks a few days ago again no reply.
The last information on the PNRC blogspot was on the 21st, February .....usually in winters they give out reports on their work on the GR20.....at the moment two reports are missing this year.
Maybe like buses several reports will arrive soon.
It is getting close to the time when the folks going to the GR20 early would want to have some information.

--

Gaffr



karkulin771

Posted: Thu, Apr 26, 2018, 5:59

New information

The snow remains very consistent throughout the GR20.
Above 1600 meters the amount of snow is still important.
A lot of the tags are not yet visible at this altitude.
Technical equipment is obligatory

Namely also that the risk of melting avalanches is marked.

The practical conditions of the GR20 will be communicated once a week.



karkulin771

Posted: Thu, May 10, 2018, 17:00

The GR20 Practical Conditions will be announced once a week. Do not you know how many days a week is in Corsica?



SQFP

Posted: Thu, May 10, 2018, 17:32

Extensive snowfields above 1800m/5900ft in the Rotondo and Cinto ranges; up to 2.2m/7ft of snow on some north-facing slopes and/or above 2400m/7800ft. (Will give a more detailed account when I'm there on saturday)

Parts of the GR are still impracticable without appropriate gear and orientation skills. All refuges are to be staffed starting this monday.

--

French geologist with a soft spot for Corsica...



Gaffr

Posted: Fri, May 11, 2018, 5:05

Hello SQFP,
Still no update on what was the position on the 21st, of April? I thought that there were going to be weekly reports during May? I was trying to work out where the area on the images was on the April 21st, report?....Northern close to Ascu perhaps? not many words to accompany the images.
I guess that there will be many folks awaiting your survey of the current conditions.
It does look good with, as you say, all refuges to be staffed from the 14th, of May?

Many thanks.

--

Gaffr



GRRR 20

Posted: Fri, May 11, 2018, 5:44

Some of those pictures are definitely from the route between Asco and Tighettu. The snow is covering the red/white markers so the only clue for route finding involves following footprints left by other trekkers. The pictures were posted over two weeks ago so things might look different at the moment. Personally, I wouldn't go at this time.



SQFP

Posted: Fri, May 11, 2018, 7:44

Yep, as mentionned at least some pics are from the Asco valley. I don't know what's happening with the regular updates, the PNRC staff is probably busy somewhere else (they are conducting various surveys for mammals, at the moment).
I got my info from people who live in the Niolo valley - as of today, "too much snow" is the take-home message.

The refuges being staffed and supplied (some have been for weeks now) has little to do with the practicability of the full GR; it is essentially a requirement as soon as the booking system reopens, i.e. on monday the 14th. Especially whenever there are various duties and chores to expedite before the obnoxious crowd arrives ;)

--

French geologist with a soft spot for Corsica...



SQFP

Posted: Sun, May 13, 2018, 8:43

Quite foggy here so no pics for the moment... will post some if weather allows.

Rotondo range (Vizzavona < > Vergio): everything above 2000m is still covered in snow. The Manganu/Ninu lake/Vergio hotel part is free of snow though. Your best bet right noe is thus : (going S to N) from Vizzavona, take a train to Corte, then follow the Mare trail to the West in the Tavignanu valley, up to the Sega refuge (about 5 hours). Then further W to Manganu refuge (about 4 hours, back on the GR), then proceed normally to the Ninu lake and Vergio hotel on the GR.

Cinto range (Vergio <> Calenzana): I can't see the northern part from here, but the Tighjettu-Ascu part (via Monte Cintu) is a no-go, snow everywhere above Tighjettu refuge and still some snowfields around Ciuttulu di i Mori refuge. I guess the Calenzana-Asco parts must suffer the same fate. If you really want to make Vergio-Calenzana: going S to N, follow the GR to the N from Vergio hotel but don't go up to the Ciuttulu refuge, instead take the Sentier de Transhumance trail (purple-orange markings) to the NW, via Guagnerola pass, to the Puscaghja refuge (it's open and friendly there :)). Then the Sentier de Transhumance, and later the Mare trails , will bring you back to Calenzana via Tuarelli, the Lucca Pass, and Bonifatu (stunning views, flowers everywhere). No snow there, hostels (Tuarelli, Bonifatu) etc.are open since April.

--

French geologist with a soft spot for Corsica...



Gaffr

Posted: Sun, May 13, 2018, 11:18

Thanks SQFP for that on the island weather and conditions summary.
I hope that the early starters on the GR20 take note of that. There are still a couple of weeks of possibly? hot sunshine to alter conditions before some of the intending starters hoping to begin at the end of May.
I guess that you would still recommend a start in the South for also the early June folks perhaps?

--

Gaffr



GRRR 20

Posted: Sun, May 13, 2018, 12:55

Early June used to be an OK time to start, but the new route from Asco to Tighjettu is significantly higher than any other part of the trail. It holds the snow for longer than anywhere else. Planning a trek along the GR20 months in advance, it's probably best to avoid early June altogether. Anyone who wants to start early must keep checking the snow conditions until the last minute and accept that they might need to change their plans.



SQFP

Posted: Mon, May 14, 2018, 7:05

Rotondo range behind Alzo plateau, Paglia Orba and Foggiale pass (GR), Pointe des Eboulis pass near Cinto (GR)
https://reho.st/self/ce1523cfba49dd349d4717d3c206d9d9541a1104.jpg

https://reho.st/self/dd298e06647dd3aef62e25c2589c11f4dbf946ac.jpg

https://reho.st/self/98f65d79957a463517ce190c3d950cf9ae6c6590.jpg

P.s. Snowstorm in the Niolo right now...

--

French geologist with a soft spot for Corsica...



charlie'thelege...

Posted: Wed, May 16, 2018, 18:30

Arriving in the great Corsica next week and wondering if anyone has any updates on the weather conditions for the whole route.

We are planning to do the whole thing in 7 days...



MrFaulty

Posted: Wed, May 16, 2018, 22:41

The whole thing in 7 days!?! Good luck, you'll be travelling light and almost running. I think I am reasonably fit and it took me 13 days last year (I did start with 25kg) and I don't think I could have done it any faster



Gaffr

Posted: Thu, May 17, 2018, 6:22

The Parc Naturel Region Corse.. PNRC....they don't appear to have issued anything regarding conditions on the route since the 21st, of April. Although fortunately there is SQFP who does work occasionally on the island....see above.

As the Moderator Michele says as well as having the site organiser not appearing to be interested in the site any more. Now there is also the infestation of spamming that takes place regularly.

We should be thankful that there are so many contributors still around to send in useful comments to those heading for the GR20...possibly one of the more difficult walking places to get to and to get around in after reaching the L'ile de Beaute.

--

Gaffr



charlie'thelege...

Posted: Thu, May 17, 2018, 8:16

Yes, thats the plan. We are very fit individuals and are prepared to do long days. We are just concerned about the snow conditions and whether it would be impractical to do parts of the northern route.



Daisychain

Posted: Thu, May 17, 2018, 9:35

On Monday 14th, Tuesday 15th May we had a lot of heavy rain on the coast and, on the radio, they were announcing snow down to 1300 metres in places. It is still cold for the season, i.e. 20° here near Ajaccio and any snow up in the mountains will not be melting at this rate.

Several years ago when we had late snow conditions in June, the PGHM (mountain police) told me that they preferred that hikers ring them to find out weather conditions in advance, rather than getting into trouble in the mountains and then needing rescue. Telephone numbers are here : https://www.montagnesdecorse.com/Infos-touristiques_a45.html



Michele
moderator

Posted: Thu, May 17, 2018, 10:03

By the way, please Daisychain correct me if I'm wrong. To save the PGHM phone number in international format, is it correct to save it this way? +33495611395 ?
Thank you

--Michele



Daisychain

Posted: Thu, May 17, 2018, 11:28

Michele, yes that is correct. All numbers in Corsica (apart from mobiles) start with +33 495, then 6 numbers.



Michele
moderator

Posted: Thu, May 17, 2018, 11:58

Excellent. Thanks



SQFP

Posted: Thu, May 17, 2018, 11:58

Live from Ciuttulu di i Mori (north of Vergio) - Still plenty of snow above 1800m, plus extra snow (5-10cm) from last Sunday starting at 1400m. Northern GR not practicable without snow gear and orientation skills, right now.

--

French geologist with a soft spot for Corsica...



Ash804

Posted: Thu, May 17, 2018, 12:42

I am hoping South section is better than north.

Ash



charlie'thelege...

Posted: Thu, May 17, 2018, 13:08

Cheers for all the help people! Would you guys recommend following the low routes in the Northern section then or will these be snowed over also?



GRRR 20

Posted: Thu, May 17, 2018, 15:40

Going north from Vizzavona it is easy to stay low, but once you climb to Petra Piana, you have to stay high. The mountain ridge between there and Manganu usually bears snow and ice early in the season. If you can negotiate it, then there should be no more problems going north until you are faced with Monte Cinto, which will always carry the most late snow.



Michele
moderator

Posted: Thu, May 17, 2018, 16:21

This is a recent pic of Bocca alle Porte https://image.ibb.co/cMh71J/bocca_alle_porte_invernale.jpg



charlie'thelege...

Posted: Thu, May 17, 2018, 17:02

We are going from North to South as we are flying into Bastia and leaving from the South. We are planning our route tomorrow



GRRR 20

Posted: Thu, May 17, 2018, 20:00

Well starting from the north means you can probably expect some snow cover on the highest parts of the first three stages. You can stay low to avoid the first two stages and even do that in one day, but you still have to climb high to reach Asco. You won't know whether it's possible to climb past Monte Cinto easily until you try, but be sure to ask locally about conditions. I climbed Monte Cinto a long time ago on a slope of snow that was unbroken for 600m to Pointe des Eboulis. But - I wouldn't risk crossing to the other side of the mountain ridge to reach Bocca Crucetta. Snow and ice on that side of the mountain is quite dangerous.



Gaffr

Posted: Thu, May 17, 2018, 20:11

Hello,
The recent image of the descent/traverse from Bocca alle Porte tells you a lot.
Arriving there after coming up from Manganu without crampons following a cold night you could put yourself into a serious situation.

--

Gaffr



charlie'thelege...

Posted: Fri, May 18, 2018, 10:46

If we were to do the first 2 stages on the low level in a day, are the conditions from carrozzu to ballone passable?



charlie'thelege...

Posted: Fri, May 18, 2018, 10:46

If we were to do the first 2 stages on the low level in a day, are the conditions from carrozzu to ballone passable?



GRRR 20

Posted: Fri, May 18, 2018, 11:33

Carrozzu to Ballone? That sounds as though you are contemplating going through the Cirque de la Solitude. That route has been closed since several people died and were injured in 2015. Some hikers who tried to get through after that time have needed rescuing. The route now passes close to Monte Cinto, which is likely to have more snow and I've on it than any other part of the trail. The only way you can avoid the new route is to travel round by bus or taxi.



Michele
moderator

Posted: Fri, May 18, 2018, 12:36

Unless they intend to cross the Cirque WITH the snow/ice!!!!



charlie'thelege...

Posted: Fri, May 18, 2018, 15:18

Sorry, I meant to say the new route thats been mapped out that avoids the cirque de la solitude and goes closer to Mount Cinto. Is there diversions around Mt Cinto that anyone knows of?

Our plan is to do the 2 low routes from Calenzana in a day and then get down to Vizzavona in 3 days on the normal GR route and do the Southern section in 3 days. We are coming on Thursday and are prepared to be doing very long walking days. We have all got crampons and poles and unless, we hear the conditions are too dangerous then we will try smash it.

Our other option would be to get a train from Bastia to Corte and then get to Vizzavona and just do the southern section.



Gaffr

Posted: Fri, May 18, 2018, 19:30

Hello,
It is sensible to have alternative plans.....another option could be go all the way down to Conca and work your way North....just see what happens when progress is made.

I know that you are on a 'fast track' approach to completing the GR20. Obviously not the best time for this in 2018 and this early in the season.
Maybe it is not possible for you to re-plan for something like a 'guide book standard' timescale of South to North?

I understand that you are starting the GR20 on the 25th, May?

--

Gaffr



SQFP

Posted: Sat, May 19, 2018, 8:42

See my previous recommendation to avoid the snowy steps between Calenzana and Vergio, and between Manganu and Vizzavona (still too much snow at the moment around Asco/Cinto and in the Rotondo range, I wouldn't do it for the next 2 weeks or so).

Basically: Calenzana - M.F.Bonifatu - Bocca di Bonassa - Bocca di Lucca - Tuarelli (gîte) - Bocca di Capronale - Puscaghja (refuge PNRC) - Bocca di Guagnarola - Vergio (refuge/hotel)
Then : Vergio - Manganu (refuge) - Sega (refuge) - Tavignanu gorges to Corte (train station) - Vizzavona (train station, gîte...) - Gr20 South

These are all good hiking paths staying below 1800m, with accommodation along the way, and enjoyable landscape.

--

French geologist with a soft spot for Corsica...



charlie'thelege...

Posted: Sat, May 19, 2018, 17:45

Yes we will be starting early doors on the 25th and aim to finish on the 31st as we need to catch our plane home on the 2nd June. Idea was to spend the last day on the beach. We are flying in to Bastia so makes sense now to start at Calenzana.

Will look into these alternative routes and have a few plans and see what seems the more logical and sensible plan when we get there.